Online Business AwardsOnline Business Awards

Within the corporate world, job loads and managing time can often bring a person down, especially when it comes to organising the office social events on top of this. However, if you’re looking to ease the pressure on your human resources department but still organise the most memorable Christmas Party yet, then read on. These four simple steps will not only teach you how to efficiently plan and manage your time, but to also spread your festive cheer.

Finding the right organiser

In order to host the perfect office Christmas Party, it is important to gather the right team of people within your workplace. Often a party committee is involved, taking charge of coordinating and setting up the event; however, in order to make sure that a successful service is maintained during the event, it is definitely advised to hire an events manager via a trustworthy company such as www.staffheroes.co.uk for the day. Not only will they relieve the pressure from the office staff, but they will also professionally uphold your event, making sure everything from entertainment to service staff are running smoothly without any faults.

Choose a theme

If you are looking to make a statement and beat the reputation of the last Christmas party, then why not choose a unique theme to boost the fun and festive morale of the evening. As the theme for a Christmas party is usually “Christmas”, break the traditional shirt and tie attire and try for an “Ugliest Jumper” competition. This can involve either buying the worst one or even creating your own out of random materials during the party.

If that doesn’t seem adventurous enough, then venture into the unknown and host a “Christmas Murder Mystery” evening, giving you the perfect excuse to get your own back on your boss for making you work extra hours. With so many different options available, you are almost guaranteed a fun-filled festive night of pure entertainment.

Plan the best entertainment

As a tie-in to your theme, it is also important to hire or prepare entertainment for your guests ahead of the event. This is again to relieve the pressure from the office staff and to make sure that everybody is getting involved and enjoying themselves.

In order to cater for all of your guests’ tastes, make sure to include activities for all ranges of personalities. This can include activities such as live music, pop up (Christmas themed) photo booths or even a team gingerbread house building competition. Not only will this improve upon professional office relationships, but it will also brand you, and the members of the party committee, as the favourite employees in your workplace.

Send invitations well in advance

On a more proficient note, the most important thing to prioritise before the planning of your Christmas party is to make sure a date is decided and that all invitations are sent out well in advance. Within the holiday season, people are often involved with other plans with friends and family, so it is extremely important to get your date finalised in peoples’ diaries.

After planning your theme, entertainment and hiring an events manager, there would be nothing worse than only a small number of employees being able to attend. Not only would this tarnish your reputation as a Human Resources worker, but it would also have been a waste of money and precious time that could’ve been spent on other jobs.

So, to summarise, if you are in charge of organising your office Christmas party, make sure to follow the preceding steps. In addition to making the evening a success, it will inevitably ensure you a spot on your boss’ nice – rather than naughty – list.

1 COMMENT

  1. […] Not only is this arrangement horribly overdone, it no longer matches up to the modern workplace. This is neither seen as luxurious or exciting, and many staff would rather the budget was spent on something a little more inspiring. Besides, there’s the fact that a lot of these parties are completely tone-deaf when it comes to including any winter holiday beyond the Christian Christmas. […]

Comments are closed.